Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) 2017

Posted by: | Posted on: Февраль 21, 2018

UntitledTransparency International’s National Chapter in Azerbaijan presents the TI Corruption Perceptions Index 2017. This year Azerbaijan received a score of 31, and was ranked 122th out of 180 countries. The CPI 2017 ranks countries in terms of the degree to which corruption is perceived to exist in the public sector. The ranking is based on a scale of 0 to 100 with 0 being very corrupt and 100 being very clean. It is thus a country’s score rather than its rank that allows comparing developments in a country over time.  In 2016 Azerbaijan was ranked 123th among 176 countries with the score of 30. Azerbaijan’s score in this year’s CPI went up by one point from the previous year. There was a positive dynamic in Azerbaijan’s position over the last 5 years. Overall, 13 data sources were used to construct CPI 2017. These reports measure a country’s status on a number of political, economic and social indicators bearing on the effectiveness of the country’s anti-corruption policies. The data for Azerbaijan is drawn from 7 different sources. Full list of sources is given in the Frequently Asked Questions.

The fact that Azerbaijan’s place in CPI has moved up by one point last year suggests the general picture of corruption has remained fixed in the country. Although the government took measures in 2017 to address some of the problems hindering businesses and enabling corruption, there is a need to widen the scope of these reforms. Economic and public service reforms contributed positively to the country’s position on CPI, but it is important to extend reforms to two areas of good governance – democratization and the rule of law in order for the country’s position to further improve on the Index. Using public funds effectively, embracing a transparent and accountable fiscal policy and expanding the citizens’ participation in the decision-making on issues of public importance could improve the government’s anti-corruption policies.

According to TI, at its 25th anniversary, CPI reveals a disturbing trend worldwide – despite attempts to combat corruption around the world, the majority of countries are moving too slowly in their efforts. In the last six years, many countries have still made little to no progress. Analysis of the index results indicates that countries with the lowest protections for civil society institutions also tend to have the worst rates of corruption. Considering this trend, space for civil society must be improved in those countries that rank poorly in the CPI.

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